Feature Well

Browsing by Topic

Dive deep into topics, issues and stories from the world of mountain culture. Each publishing cycle is highlighted by a feature well theme, drawing together like-minded by wholly independent stories from some of the best writers and photographers in North America.

From record-breaking sprints to month-long slogs, we explore the evolution of Kootenay ski traversing.

It’s the dream of many Kootenay kids: be discovered on the slopes, get air time in popular ski videos, and ride a wave of sponsorship dollars. Then what? Freeskiing star Sam Kuch contemplates it all after a brutal crash sidelined his ride.

For almost two decades, Chad Sayers has danced at the precipice between this world and the next. Here are his closest encounters.

THE YEAR WAS 1990. Backcountry skiing was, at least for the average recreational skier, the stuff of dreams. If you were a young person in…

In the West Kootenay region, the sheer number of adventure-tourism tenures is causing conflict among users and instigating impassioned pleas from the public for the government to press pause on the process.

In 1956, the Sinixt people were declared extinct by the Canadian government. After an 11-year legal battle, the Supreme Court of Canada has ruled the Sinixt should now have access to their traditional hunting territory, which encompasses a large swath of the West Kootenay region. What does this mean for their “extinct” status and their future?

We remember Rossland legend Gary Camozzi and revisit our article about him that ran in the Winter 07/08 issue of Kootenay Mountain Culture Magazine. You were one of a kind, Gary. We’ll miss you.

Alpine canyoning is a relatively new sport in Canada, but despite the dangers, which include hypothermia, rockfalls, and the possibility of plunging off high peaks, it’s growing in popularity. As our writer discovers, sometimes it’s worth chasing waterfalls.

How can privately owned forests in highly visible and visited areas be logged seemingly without regulation or community input? Journalist Jeff Davies explains the complexities of British Columbia forest-land classifications and how one Kootenay community rallied to take action.

Up against the rugged and remote stage of British Columbia’s northern coast, a charismatic cast of Ursus arctos horribilis plays our a hairy tale of love, lust, and loss.

Trevor Goward of Clearwater, British Columbia has dedicated his life to the study of lichen and his discoveries have earned him notoriety around the world.

Once for the fringe among us, disc golf has catapulted into one of the fastest-growing sports in the modern world. Let’s go for a walk in the chain-linked woods to toss a few wheels and find out why.

Meet the marijuana business mega-player who’s established a next-level, world-class research facility in Comox, British Columbia.

Amiththan Sebarajah was a child when he immigrated to Canada from Sri Lanka to escape his birth country’s violent civil war. Now a Kootenay resident and accomplished thru-hiker, the 38-year-old tackles the duality of challenging long-distance solo routes and the lingering trauma of redefining home.

Do you belong here? A researcher and guide asks whether she’s a gatekeeper of the mountains.

Ahead of a season presumed to emphasize local travel, Summit Lake and its diminutive peers won’t have trouble filling accommodation — because they don’t have any.

Not so long ago it was home to one of the most astounding fish populations in North America. Since 2014, however, the once mighty Gerrard struggles to reach five pounds. How is that possible you ask? As our intrepid journalist discovers, the answers are not so easy to catch.

Ayahuasca, peyote, Psilocybe semilanceata, and Turbina corymbose are not household names or readily available at your local pharmacy. But Western culture is beginning to embrace…

Once a seemingly distant siren threatening tomorrow’s generations, the age of extinction is upon us, with worldwide evidence of wildlife gone forever. KMC’s Emily Nilsen reflects upon the fate of North America’s South Selkirk caribou herd and the meaning of their disappearance.

Ruling against the questionable aims of an American billionaire, BC’s Supreme Court has granted the public access to parts of Canada’s largest privately owned cattle ranch. Despite the high court’s decision, some of the province’s outdoor recreation stakeholders wonder if too many cows have already left the barn.