Issues

Browsing by Topic

There are always issues. From backcountry safety to environmental bureaucracy. We’re not afraid to dig to the core of some of mountain culture’s most pressing issues.

The Kootenays are home to the world’s only inland temperate rainforest, and its uniqueness attracts everyone from tree huggers to tree cutters.

Shayna Jones’s multimedia project explores narratives of race in the face of rural living. By Louis Bockner

Mountain Muskox is a new group-therapy program offering hope for survivors of alpine trauma.

In the West Kootenay region, the sheer number of adventure-tourism tenures is causing conflict among users and instigating impassioned pleas from the public for the government to press pause on the process.

In 1956, the Sinixt people were declared extinct by the Canadian government. After an 11-year legal battle, the Supreme Court of Canada has ruled the Sinixt should now have access to their traditional hunting territory, which encompasses a large swath of the West Kootenay region. What does this mean for their “extinct” status and their future?

Editor-in-chief Mitchell Scott explores his other half in this latest Backside Column about all of our alter egos.

How can privately owned forests in highly visible and visited areas be logged seemingly without regulation or community input? Journalist Jeff Davies explains the complexities of British Columbia forest-land classifications and how one Kootenay community rallied to take action.

Award-winning journalist Bob Keating has retired from journalism after a 35-year career and launched the Kootenay Time Podcast. 

Meet the marijuana business mega-player who’s established a next-level, world-class research facility in Comox, British Columbia.

There are few things to celebrate during a global pandemic, but as our senior writer observes, the demise of the handshake may well be one of them.

Editor-in-chief Mitchell Scott goes deep down the drain to ponder pee in his Backside column from the Summer 2020 issue of Kootenay Mountain Culture magazine.

From the editorial in the Summer 2020 issue, in which we featured a mash-up of Coast and Kootenay content, here is our editor on why…

Editor Vince Hempsall offers a glimpse into the world of rogue media, why we’re seeing more of it in our communities, and why it’s so important.

Fashion icon Coco Chanel once said the best way to lose your cares is to be someone, not something. As our senior writer discovers, these drag performers are sharing that message with people of all ages.

In his latest Backside column, editor-in-chief Mitchell Scott asks whether we’ve become too obsessed with staying alive. After all, if death is inevitable for all of us, why are we so scared of it?

Dr. Suzanne Simard has proven trees communicate with one another. Now she’s leading the Mother Tree project at 75 sites across British Columbia and sharing her research with those in the forestry industry. The question is, will they listen?

Now available for free screen on CBC Gem, the “Creatures of Convenience” documentary will have you rethinking your trash. We interview producer Momme Halbe about how it all came together.

Amiththan Sebarajah was a child when he immigrated to Canada from Sri Lanka to escape his birth country’s violent civil war. Now a Kootenay resident and accomplished thru-hiker, the 38-year-old tackles the duality of challenging long-distance solo routes and the lingering trauma of redefining home.

It’s never been more important for Kootenay residents to shop locally. This is how.

Do you belong here? A researcher and guide asks whether she’s a gatekeeper of the mountains.