Issues

Browsing by Topic

There are always issues. From backcountry safety to environmental bureaucracy. We’re not afraid to dig to the core of some of mountain culture’s most pressing issues.

Take a virtual-reality trip to the glaciers of Iceland, the remote fishing villages of Indonesia and more on November 30, between 7-10pm, in Nelson, British Columbia. VR headsets will be on hand and the experience is free and open to people of all ages.

Scott Sommerville, chief administrative officer of the City of Kimberley in southeast British Columbia was the brainchild behind building Canada’s largest tracking solar array: the SunMine.

In 2018, the CEO of Columbia Lake Technology Center, Lorri Fehr, helped turn the quaint village of Canal Flats, BC, into a test piece for rural economic revitalization by farming data: the world’s newest valuable resource.

Entrepreneur Don Freschi’s company cheaply, cleanly and cleverly, combines otherwise toxic by-products from the smelter in Trail, BC, to make new metals for semiconductors and the solar-energy industry.

Rossland entrepreneur Darrel Fry of Pulp Traction wants to make plastics you can put in your garden or in the ocean and they’ll break down. And he’s using trees to do it.

The Columbia Basin Trust has announced it will help create 198 new child care spaces and improve 1,256 existing spaces in the Kootenay region.

Patagonia has announced all 61 of its waterproof shells are now made with recycled materials in Fair Trade Certified factories.

As the Pacific Northwest clings to much of the planet’s remaining old-growth timber, what should be left to stand and what needs to fall? We report on the paradox plaguing our last greatest forests with a chorus of voices from every corner of the clear-cut.

I don’t want to eat less meat. I hate recycling. But I’m going to keep trying. Above all else, I will not be angry and resentful. I’ll go outside and ride and surf and hike so I can stay connected to what’s most important.

Amid concerns over the endangerment of species, spaces, and cowboy culture itself, the American Prairie Reserve project could succeed in protecting the contiguous United State’s largest nature reserve. All it will take is $500 million and a passion for progress, each victory measured in blades of wild grass.

The BC Court of Appeal has ruled Jumbo Glacier Resort no longer has a valid environmental certificate and development cannot go ahead until re-assessed.

Hundreds of stalwart volunteers are digging in and raking muck in BC streams for the precious salmon and its precarious future.

Sweeping monopolization, unprecedented newsroom cuts, and the internet have done great harm to local journalism. Will communities ever be as critically well informed as they one were. We report on the state of the press.

A new school of linguistic experts and cultural researchers is beginning to discover a connection between endangered languages and collapsing ecologies. Can we save the world one word at a time?

One of BC’s leading wildfire ecologists, Robert Gray, says British Columbians can expect fire in the woods and smoke in the air for decades to come. “This is what the future looks like, and, if anything, it’s going to be worse than this,” he says.

Most in the village seem to smoke. All of their butts tossed into these stunning waters—on which their whole life depends.

Given a choice of any beverage, most black bears and grizzlies would probably not stuff their snouts into a vat of gin. But in Fernie, British Columbia, a company has distilled a drink with Ursidae in mind.

Want to live to 100? While science has discovered mountain zones around the globe where centenarians are thriving, Editor Vince Hempsall reports there’s more to a life of longevity than big walks over the hill. 

When the Nunavik Youth Hockey Development Program was cancelled, filmmaker Jonnie Broi decided to do a documentary about how vital it was for the kids of Nunavik. This is the film and our Q&A with him.

Ten years before Lewis and Clark crossed the continent, Alexander Mackenzie reached the Pacific Ocean through British Columbia’s Peace River area – now being threatened by the Site C Dam. A new book excerpt tells how it was a journey ironically assisted, and foretold, by First Nations who preceded him by millennia.