Issues

Browsing by Topic

There are always issues. From backcountry safety to environmental bureaucracy. We’re not afraid to dig to the core of some of mountain culture’s most pressing issues.

It’s never been more important for Kootenay residents to shop locally. This is how.

Do you belong here? A researcher and guide asks whether she’s a gatekeeper of the mountains.

Amiththan Sebarajah was a child when he immigrated to Canada from Sri Lanka to escape his birth country’s violent civil war. Now a Kootenay resident and accomplished thru-hiker, the 38-year-old tackles the duality of challenging long-distance solo routes and the lingering trauma of redefining home.

Ahead of a season presumed to emphasize local travel, Summit Lake and its diminutive peers won’t have trouble filling accommodation — because they don’t have any.

Not so long ago it was home to one of the most astounding fish populations in North America. Since 2014, however, the once mighty Gerrard struggles to reach five pounds. How is that possible you ask? As our intrepid journalist discovers, the answers are not so easy to catch.

This year has been an interesting one for many, including skier Cam Mclellan of Invermere, British Columbia, who writes about how he’s been adhering to a 100-mile diet of adventure.

We’ve all seen the bad news. But what good news stories are happening out there during the Covid-19 global pandemic? We’re collecting them all here.

Ayahuasca, peyote, Psilocybe semilanceata, and Turbina corymbose are not household names or readily available at your local pharmacy. But Western culture is beginning to embrace…

Once a seemingly distant siren threatening tomorrow’s generations, the age of extinction is upon us, with worldwide evidence of wildlife gone forever. KMC’s Emily Nilsen reflects upon the fate of North America’s South Selkirk caribou herd and the meaning of their disappearance.

Ruling against the questionable aims of an American billionaire, BC’s Supreme Court has granted the public access to parts of Canada’s largest privately owned cattle ranch. Despite the high court’s decision, some of the province’s outdoor recreation stakeholders wonder if too many cows have already left the barn.

An open-pit mine threatens 151 kilometres of salmon-bearing streams in Alaska. The film Fish First documents what’s at stake.

From the feature opener of the latest issue of Coast Mountain Culture magazine, editor Mike Berard describes the impact pro skier Dave Treadway had on his life and his faith.

From the editor’s introduction of “The Future” issue of Kootenay Mountain Culture magazine, managing editor Vince Hempsall pens a letter to his infant son for him to open and read in 2039.

Ocean Falls, BC, was once so booming, it boasted Canada’s first indoor swimming pool. Then the bust. Now cryptocurrency is breathing new life into this coastal community.

My intuition tells me the future will be about people taking back their time and, in the process, freedom.

Take a virtual-reality trip to the glaciers of Iceland, the remote fishing villages of Indonesia and more on November 30, between 7-10pm, in Nelson, British Columbia. VR headsets will be on hand and the experience is free and open to people of all ages.

Scott Sommerville, chief administrative officer of the City of Kimberley in southeast British Columbia was the brainchild behind building Canada’s largest tracking solar array: the SunMine.

In 2018, the CEO of Columbia Lake Technology Center, Lorri Fehr, helped turn the quaint village of Canal Flats, BC, into a test piece for rural economic revitalization by farming data: the world’s newest valuable resource.

Entrepreneur Don Freschi’s company cheaply, cleanly and cleverly, combines otherwise toxic by-products from the smelter in Trail, BC, to make new metals for semiconductors and the solar-energy industry.

Rossland entrepreneur Darrel Fry of Pulp Traction wants to make plastics you can put in your garden or in the ocean and they’ll break down. And he’s using trees to do it.