History

Browsing by Topic

To refuse the stories of the past is to disregard the headwaters from which we flow. Both magazines regularly investigate the tales of our most influential tributaries.

It’s never been more important for Kootenay residents to shop locally. This is how.

Amiththan Sebarajah was a child when he immigrated to Canada from Sri Lanka to escape his birth country’s violent civil war. Now a Kootenay resident and accomplished thru-hiker, the 38-year-old tackles the duality of challenging long-distance solo routes and the lingering trauma of redefining home.

Unsure if that blazing night light was a UFO? Maybe it was one of these extraordinary meteors that has entered British Columbia airspace in the last 20 years.

From audio anomalies to celestial orbs, there is no shortage of Kootenay UFO sightings. Are they hallucinations? Hoaxes? Writer Derrick Knowles gets up close with what is interstellar.

We’ve all seen the bad news. But what good news stories are happening out there during the Covid-19 global pandemic? We’re collecting them all here.

An infamous arctic expedition gone awry. Cannibalism. Historical blasphemy. Three adventurers struggle to retrace the fateful path of a 19th-Century explorer the world should know about.

From the editor’s introduction of “The Future” issue of Kootenay Mountain Culture magazine, managing editor Vince Hempsall pens a letter to his infant son for him to open and read in 2039.

In an ode to the unkempt and disdained, writer Steve Threndyle dives into the history of one of the most commonly used descriptives in mountain circles. We suggest you read this, dirtbags.

Sweeping monopolization, unprecedented newsroom cuts, and the internet have done great harm to local journalism. Will communities ever be as critically well informed as they one were. We report on the state of the press.

Last summer members of the Canadian-Eh Society set out to re-enact the 1926 expedition to Mt. Waddington, the highest mountain in British Columbia’s Coast Range. This is why they failed.

One of BC’s leading wildfire ecologists, Robert Gray, says British Columbians can expect fire in the woods and smoke in the air for decades to come. “This is what the future looks like, and, if anything, it’s going to be worse than this,” he says.

Historian and writer Greg Nesteroff shares the story of Bill Lane, an undercover FBI agent sent to the Slocan Valley to ferret out counter-culture radicals. Maybe you met him?

In 1900, Mary Vaux became the first woman to reach a peak over 10,000 feet in Canada when she summited Mount Stephen. Her work with glaciers has been invaluable and her photographs of various plant species are now archived in the Smithsonian.

Do you have what it takes to ski, bike, paddle and pant your way from Mt. Baker to Bellingham? Here’s the history of one of the most fascinating races in the PNW.

But from the Okanagan to Northern Montana, and around the world, witches exist not to spook nor hex, but to enlighten and empower.

Thirty years after the world watched British Columbia’s War in the Woods, Clayoquot Sound is stirring with unrest again. Amid Indigenous People’s struggle to steward the land and the resource sector’s goal to employ, a million annual visitors now stream to this delicate place, a land of beauty that was once off the radar but is now off the charts.

Once an icy and somewhat wacky weapon intended for WWII action, Jasper, Alberta’s abandoned Habbakuk hulk is now a deep treasure for divers.

Christina Lustenberger is considered one of the foremost big-mountain skiers of her generation. We chronicle the career of a down-to-earth athlete who lives for more than shredding the edge.

Sherpas Cinema, the production house behind Imagination, has released its latest film, “Children of Columbia: A Skier’s Odyssey.” Watch it here.

A new documentary chronicles the love, uncertain liberty and all-American pursuit of happiness that found its way to the remote Canadian West Coast over half a century ago.