Culture

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It defines us through understanding and expression. Culture represents the boundaries of what we stand for, the direction in which we’re going, the beautiful pieces that make humanity both beautiful and interesting. It’s the music and the art, the movements and the ideas. And it explodes in the mountains.

Hundreds of stalwart volunteers are digging in and raking muck in BC streams for the precious salmon and its precarious future.

Two British Columbia events have been awarded best festivals by DJ Mag: Bass Coast in Merritt won “Best Boutique Festival” and Shambhala in Salmo won “Best Music Festival.”

Revelstoke, British Columbia’s Luna Festival unites newcomers, old-timers, artsy-smartsies, and adreno-bingers in the name of art, wonder, and a little extra economic growth.

Sweeping monopolization, unprecedented newsroom cuts, and the internet have done great harm to local journalism. Will communities ever be as critically well informed as they one were. We report on the state of the press.

A new school of linguistic experts and cultural researchers is beginning to discover a connection between endangered languages and collapsing ecologies. Can we save the world one word at a time?

Surf Anywhere got its break on the Kananaskis River, but today the river-surfing company is creating waves around the world.

Last summer members of the Canadian-Eh Society set out to re-enact the 1926 expedition to Mt. Waddington, the highest mountain in British Columbia’s Coast Range. This is why they failed.

Former Hazelton, BC, mayor Alice Maitland has spoken out on all matters of small-town politics, including big-business bullying and indigenous rights — and she’s only 85.

One of BC’s leading wildfire ecologists, Robert Gray, says British Columbians can expect fire in the woods and smoke in the air for decades to come. “This is what the future looks like, and, if anything, it’s going to be worse than this,” he says.

Red Teeth, the Mountain Wine Festival hosted by Red Mountain Resort and the Josie Hotel, returns June 28 to July 1, 2019.

Most in the village seem to smoke. All of their butts tossed into these stunning waters—on which their whole life depends.

Given a choice of any beverage, most black bears and grizzlies would probably not stuff their snouts into a vat of gin. But in Fernie, British Columbia, a company has distilled a drink with Ursidae in mind.

Tucked into the cleavage of Mount Fromme and the rear end of Vancouver’s North Shore, The VanTan Club invites recreationalists of all shapes and sizes to undress for success.

Every May, motorheads converge on Canal Flats, British Columbia, for some good ol’ cut and chase.

Historian and writer Greg Nesteroff shares the story of Bill Lane, an undercover FBI agent sent to the Slocan Valley to ferret out counter-culture radicals. Maybe you met him?

Want to live to 100? While science has discovered mountain zones around the globe where centenarians are thriving, Editor Vince Hempsall reports there’s more to a life of longevity than big walks over the hill. 

When the Nunavik Youth Hockey Development Program was cancelled, filmmaker Jonnie Broi decided to do a documentary about how vital it was for the kids of Nunavik. This is the film and our Q&A with him.

In 1900, Mary Vaux became the first woman to reach a peak over 10,000 feet in Canada when she summited Mount Stephen. Her work with glaciers has been invaluable and her photographs of various plant species are now archived in the Smithsonian.

Ten years before Lewis and Clark crossed the continent, Alexander Mackenzie reached the Pacific Ocean through British Columbia’s Peace River area – now being threatened by the Site C Dam. A new book excerpt tells how it was a journey ironically assisted, and foretold, by First Nations who preceded him by millennia.

Do you have what it takes to ski, bike, paddle and pant your way from Mt. Baker to Bellingham? Here’s the history of one of the most fascinating races in the PNW.