Culture

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It defines us through understanding and expression. Culture represents the boundaries of what we stand for, the direction in which we’re going, the beautiful pieces that make humanity both beautiful and interesting. It’s the music and the art, the movements and the ideas. And it explodes in the mountains.

Historian and writer Greg Nesteroff shares the story of Bill Lane, an undercover FBI agent sent to the Slocan Valley to ferret out counter-culture radicals. Maybe you met him?

Want to live to 100? While science has discovered mountain zones around the globe where centenarians are thriving, Editor Vince Hempsall reports there’s more to a life of longevity than big walks over the hill. 

When the Nunavik Youth Hockey Development Program was cancelled, filmmaker Jonnie Broi decided to do a documentary about how vital it was for the kids of Nunavik. This is the film and our Q&A with him.

In 1900, Mary Vaux became the first woman to reach a peak over 10,000 feet in Canada when she summited Mount Stephen. Her work with glaciers has been invaluable and her photographs of various plant species are now archived in the Smithsonian.

Ten years before Lewis and Clark crossed the continent, Alexander Mackenzie reached the Pacific Ocean through British Columbia’s Peace River area – now being threatened by the Site C Dam. A new book excerpt tells how it was a journey ironically assisted, and foretold, by First Nations who preceded him by millennia.

Do you have what it takes to ski, bike, paddle and pant your way from Mt. Baker to Bellingham? Here’s the history of one of the most fascinating races in the PNW.

But from the Okanagan to Northern Montana, and around the world, witches exist not to spook nor hex, but to enlighten and empower.

This summer construction will begin on the longest alpine water slide in the world in Rossland, BC.

From the Backside column of Coast Mountain Culture #15, Mitchell Scott delivers a treatise on a subject close to our hearts…and eyelids.

In this book review we look at Big Lonely Doug by Harley Rustad. It’s more than just a story of a lone fir tree; it’s about the history and ecology of our forests.

When skins and sweat are not enough to outrun the crowd, some ski tourers are heading for the sled. Are snowmobiles an inevitable mode of adventure for those yearning to go deeper and farther faster?

There sure is, bud. But thanks to its nose for toxins and consumer-protection laws, an Oregon lab is helping legitimize the state’s cannabis industry in ways not seen anywhere else.

The 13th Annual Kootenay Coldsmoke Powder Festival is landing February 22-24 at Whitewater Ski Resort. Here’s what you can expect from the event.

Chelsie McCutcheon has seen poverty, addiction, and familial dysfunction. She is a shredder with spirit bridging the gap between kids and communities, on snow and soil.

Thirty years after the world watched British Columbia’s War in the Woods, Clayoquot Sound is stirring with unrest again. Amid Indigenous People’s struggle to steward the land and the resource sector’s goal to employ, a million annual visitors now stream to this delicate place, a land of beauty that was once off the radar but is now off the charts.

Mike Powell is a Seattle podcaster who delves into the stories and opinions of action-sports insiders and icons. Here’s why so many are tuning in to the Powell Movement.

Canada’s most celebrated indigenous designer and America’s original counterculture super-ban, the Grateful Dead, have something in common. This is it.

Once an icy and somewhat wacky weapon intended for WWII action, Jasper, Alberta’s abandoned Habbakuk hulk is now a deep treasure for divers.

From lab to cash till, summit to toe, 3D printing is gonna change what adventurers wear and where they buy it. By Ryan Stuart.

Amid exploding molars, societal decay, and a Mayan microclimate, a volunteer British Columbia dentist searches for the root of it all in Guatemala.